Tag Archives: plants

A Drawing A Day – Week 37

Another skimpy post this week…………………. I am at a loss to where my days go, and so quickly too.

252 Washing line and water butt

252 Washing line and water butt

253 Cyclamen 1

253 Cyclamen 1

254 Cyclamen 2

254 Cyclamen 2

255 Cyclamen 3

255 Cyclamen 3

256 Cyclamen 4

256 Cyclamen 4

257 Cyclamen 5

257 Cyclamen 5

258 Cyclamen Leaf

258 Cyclamen Leaf

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Pumpkins & Callicarpa

Bit of a quickie this week…………

Started the week having a go at some pumpkins, they are satisfying to sketch with their lovely round forms.

Pencil Sketch of Pumpkin

 

Pencil Sketch of Pumpkin

Then my eye was caught by a Callicarpa growing in the garden, it catches my eye and my attention every year because of the glorious colour of the berries, its common name is ‘beauty berry’ and I understand why.

Callicarpa

I decided to make this the subject of my next coloured pencil drawing….. a great excuse to use the purples that have been lurking around unused since I tried a Cerinthe back in the spring.  Lush!

Callicarpa coloured pencil drawing

 

A close up of how it is progressing.

Callicarpa coloured pencil drawing

 

 

Still here!

It’s not that I have not been drawing but I have not been drawing very much, my intentions of drawing every day just flew out the window.  The only artistic tool I have had in my hand for the last month has been a paintbrush – a house painting brush.

So, what have I done?  Well on two occasions I was overambitious and started drawings of large specimens which I was unable to continue with or to finish.  I did not think forward about how my days were going to pan out and then when I got back to the drawing the specimen had shrivelled, withered and I did not have back up photographs.  Another good lesson to learn; think hard before starting something ambitious.  Pictures attached are very poor as the graphite is too faint for my photography skills and I have over adjusted the contrast.  I have just put them in for the record.

Drawing

 

Drawing of Teasel

I also had a go at drawing outside again, sitting in the sunshine with the breeze waving the plants around.  Good practice at looking and remembering and not being too precious.  I love poppy seed heads, they are so much fun to draw, seem like little crowds of people.

Drawing of Poppies

Poppies

I also had a go at Crocosmia, which actually flowered in the garden this year, it seems to have been a good growing year for many things.   This also was a venturing into colour for the first time for a long time – and it was orange again – I have a weird attraction to orange I realise that now…….  Again I was disheartened by my efforts, my petals end up heavy and lumpy.

Drawing of Crocosmia

Drawing of Crocosmia

Drawing of CrocosmiaThe final drawings I have managed are of a fantastic Dahlia flower that is so luscious in colour changing from apricot (orange!!), peach (pale orange!!) to yellow with lots of yummy shades in-between.  A massive challenge to draw with so many petals twisting and turning this way and that, but that bit went quite well. I then traced off my drawing to give me the base for a colour drawing.  Taking advice from others that have been kind enough to support me I used an underpainting of yellow watercolour to cover the paper before starting with the coloured pencils.

Drawing of Dahlia

Pencil drawing

Working drawing

Working drawing

Coloured pencil drawing of Dahlia

The colours are not quite right in the photo so this detail shows them better.

Detail of Dahlia drawing

Detail of Dahlia drawing

But my petals are still lumpy and thick.  However, excitingly, I am starting a coloured drawing course later this afternoon with Ann Swan who is a brilliant coloured pencil botanical artist and I am hoping to learn loads; whole week of drawing and learning, how lucky am I!

Feeling better

I hit a low spot last week; took on too much so I felt overburdened and put upon.  But action has been taken – I have dropped one commitment and reviewed my attitude to my own efforts (I would hate to work for me, I am a hard taskmaster indeed).  But enough of this already and onto what has made it onto paper this week.

In the hope that eventually I would draw something that I would like to own as mine own, I fiddled around with my signature.  My initials are S & H which together can look like a dollar sign ($). Here are my efforts, I wanted to include the date in some way but decided that month and year were enough:

P1010502

 

The one I think I will go with is below, but looking at it again I might change my mind (any comments or suggestions would be appreciated).

P1010503

Plant of the week was the wonderful Foxglove; they spread themselves elegantly about the garden in shades of cream, white and maroon, with beautiful markings; just beautiful and enticing to draw.  Despite the lush colour I stayed with pencil.

Foxglove by Sue Hagley

Foxglove by Sue HagleySuch fun to draw……

 

Well I met my posting target this week, but that is all.

I am going to post the four scrubby drawing I managed this week.  I put them up as the intention of this blog is to share my progress as I struggle to revive my art practice.  The best thing that I can say about them is that they have been done.  I have managed to hack out a couple of hours and to sit myself in front of a drawing board and start, which is no mean achievement this week.  I had another go at the Easter Cactus.

P1010501

But the plant that caught my eye in the garden was another weed – this time the wild carrot (Daucus carota) a small specimen but bushy and growing well.  I read that it is a plant of high summer so that shows how forward the season is this year after the mild winter.  The attraction was the festoon of bracts beneath the flower umbel so I had a good scribbly go at them.

P1010499

P1010498

And finally this afternoon I attempted a more detailed sketch.

P1010500

When the flowers are finished and they turn to seed, the flower heads contract and become concave like birds’-nests.  I like this plant, it grows well in the garden and the hover flies love it

 

 

 

Getting to be an exhibition junky………..The Society of Botanical Artists Annual Exhibition 2014


P1010470I went by myself to a Botanical Art exhibition, ‘how sad’ you say, but no it was great, it was just what was needed.  I had no one to talk to, no distractions, no worrying about if someone else was bored, tired or hungry, needed the loo or just wanted to go home.  I just had myself to please and somehow that does not happen very often.

I was able to go around the show which ran to nearly 700 pieces and look at each one individually.  I treated my visit as a learning experience and decided to analyse the pictures I liked and to decide what it was in that image that ‘spoke’ to me, and then I took notes (nerdy or what?)  Still I was there by myself so I could please myself!

At the end of three and a half hours, these are my findings about the things that I liked:

  • images that were larger than life size
  • compositions that overflowed their own boundaries
  • images that were ‘arrangements’ of separate items
  • gouache compared to straight water colour
  • images that were a single item (e.g. leaf)
  • interesting cropping that filled the picture plane
  • the combo of graphite and colour

I also noticed that some subjects are just ‘done to death’ and however beautiful and clever the work there is really nothing much new to say about strawberries, peppers, conkers, aubergines, tulips, daffodils, onions, garlic, carrots, cherries, orchids, iris, violas………….. I could go on.  That said, I’m sure I’m going to have a go at all of these over the coming months.

Artists I liked:

Some amazing work in the exhibition and so many talented artists.

Back at my own drawing board, things are not so amazing………. This week I followed instructions from a book called ‘ Creating Radiant Flowers in Colored Pencil’, this had instructions about using solvents to dissolve and blend coloured pencil.

With and without solvent

With and without solvent

First petal is just blended/burnished pencil and second one has had solvent applied to blend the colours, not only is it bigger (not caused by solvent but by operator error) but it is brighter, so I guess that is one way of getting really intense colour.

Then I went onto my plant of the week, which this week is my flowering ‘Easter’ cactus, this flowers for me every year and survives on neglect.  Have not put much time into it but I did try to have a go at the flower, pale pink almost white in places, how do you draw white petals on white paper?  Another skill to learn – to be added to the list.

Easter Cactus drawing by Sue Hagley

Easter Cactus

In which the author meets a virtual internet friend in real reality and spends the day in London.

I obviously don’t get out much! But this has been an exciting and encouraging week, in which I have seen some quality botanical art, met a great teacher and met some new people.  I am a member of the FaceBook page Botanical Art for Beginners, and I found out that a fellow member would also be at the RHS Botanical Art Exhibition in London.  We arranged to meet and amazingly we found each other, in that great crowded hall.  She introduced me to Ann Swan a pencil art teacher and author, who was coming to Dedham Hall (just down the road from me) to teach for a week, she was kind enough to let me gatecrash one of her classes so I did.  Some wonderful work was going on, and Ann is a supportive and knowledgable teacher, everyone was really friendly and I have made contact now with a local group which meets monthly.  The quality of the artwork at the RHS show was amazing, very inspiring and very varied, something to aspire to one day (in my next lifetime!)

Clematis Montana drawing

Clematis Montana drawing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Even with all the excitement of London and Dedham I did get some drawing done, and this week what interested me was our Clematis Montana coming out, it seems to be best ever this year, maybe all the rain last year helped.  Petals again, oh dear, but practice makes perfect so I had another go.

Two clematis flowers

Two clematis flowers

Rough drawings

Rough drawings

So it is all very well being able to draw a plant fairly accurately, but what I realised at the exhibition this week is that accuracy does not an ‘artwork’ make.  Well, that’s obvious, obviously but it had not really sunk in; but visiting this class I could see that although the plant material was there the students were using it as inspiration rather than a guide.  So having done my preparatory drawings and photos of the clematis I thought I would have a go at ‘composition’.  I therefore spent a happy few hours with tracing paper, IPad, drawings, scissors and eraser laying out my first composition.

Clematis composition

Clematis composition

What I had noticed when I photographed the plant was that all the buds looked like little faces searching for the sunshine, so I tried to get the feeling in my picture of the buds and opening blossoms straining towards the warmth.  Not sure if it has worked but I am going to go with it, it is only small (a finished size of 6 inches square).