Tag Archives: tomato

Ally Pally, an old friend, a new toy and the Milton method

This week I made my annual pilgrimage to Ally Pally (Alexandra Palace for those of you in far flung places) to the Knitting and Stitching show.  There, those of a textile persuasion gather to indulge their passion…….. to look, to touch and to buy.  So much to buy…… and I did put my hand in my pocket: my purchase, a magnificent magnifying glass with daylight LEDs – wonderful.

Magnifier

Magnifier

This year the exhibition felt very different for me, I finally felt that textiles was no longer my ‘thing’: don’t get me wrong I still love fabric, yarn and cloth in all its wondrous variety but it no longer grabs me to ‘do it myself’, it’s been a long goodbye  but it’s over.  Contributing to that feeling was meeting someone from my past quilting life who was exhibiting there and it felt really good to catch up with her and hear about other members of the Quilt Art group of which I used to be a member but I have really moved on (at last).

Back to more pressing matters, the nasty stain on my drawing.  I don’t know how it got there or what it is but it looks like watercolour (but it can’t be).  I decided that I would try and remove it using ‘the Milton method’ that I learned from Ann Swan .  Milton fluid is used in the UK to sterilise infant feeding equipment.

The Problem

The Problem

So the method is to use a cotton bud and dab the solution onto the mark, not rubbing and then to blot it off using tissue.  I tried it out on a spare piece of paper first  and then went for it!  Slowly as I dabbed and blotted the mark faded and I was left with a wet patch.

Waiting

Waiting

Finally the paper dried and the mark was gone – amazing…..

Gone

Gone

Very happy with the result, now that it is fully dry it does not show at all, especially as the mark will not be as enlarged as the above photo.  I then tidied up my picture, erasing all the other marks and sharpened up my edges.

Finished image

Finished image

Finished picture is called ‘Ripening’, I really enjoyed working on it and realise that may be because as a ‘recovering quilt maker’ I am very attached to repetition and pattern.

Progress and Felt

Not much chance to do very much this week with a trip to London to help with a house move.  But some colouring in did take place.  I am happy with the intensity of colour I am getting, but a mysterious mark has appeared on my white paper and I am at a loss as to where it came from…. Not tea or coffee, I suspect a spider or a fly or even an earwig!  Using an eraser has not worked so I am going to have to try the Milton fluid technique.

Work in Progress

Work in Progress

There was also a meeting of our felting group this Saturday and here is the piece of felt I produced, only 3 more to go and then I shall make myself a multicoloured waistcoat, or bag, or pillow, or tea cosy – who knows? something anyway.  Circles seem to be a theme…….

Spotty Felt Panel

Spotty Felt Panel

An ample sufficiency of tomatoes

Coming in from hanging out the washing I saw this wonderful display of tomatoes laid out to ripen.  They really caught my eye and I noticed with what care they had been arranged.  My next project I thought!

Tomatoes

Tomatoes

I have just recently worked on tomatoes with Ann Swan so I thought I would like to have another go, and this would allow me to practice tomatoes at all stages of ripening.

I already knew what colours to use so I was able to get started quickly, was not bothered too much about composition as I was happy just to work with the tomatoes in a grid formation.

Green Tomato

Green Tomato

I trialled a green and a red tomato using the underpainting technique I learned and using the transparent Pro Marker to dissolve the colour into the paper.  This meant that the base colour application is much quicker, I tried underpainting the green tomato in green Pro Marker but the colour was too dark.

Red Tomato

Red Tomato

Happy with both my trials I cobbled together a light box with a sheet of glass, a cardboard box and a desk lamp and traced onto good paper; then I had a happy afternoon putting on the base colour underpainting, now all I have to do is colour all those babies in!  I suspect I won’t be as fond of tomatoes when I am finished!

Tomatoes with underpainting completed

Tomatoes with underpainting completed